Tips and tricks from our expert staff. From Recipes to product recommendations we will be your knowledge source for all things Butcher. 

Corned Beef Saturday Evening. Corned Beef Hash Sunday Morning.

March 09, 2017

Corned Beef Saturday Evening. Corned Beef Hash Sunday Morning.
St. Patrick's Day is fast approaching. We've begun our annual brisket curing and they are ready for pre-order! You can pick them up anytime between now and March 17th. We vacuum seal each brisket so they will continue to cure until opened. If you are more of a Do-It-Yourselfer, hurry in for some uncured briskets and check out our post on brining at home here.   Corned beef and cabbage washed down with a tall, creamy stout is a must on St. Patrick's Day. But what happens when you are left with half of a cured brisket the next day? Well, luckily the next day this year is a Sunday. Call your friends and tell them to come back to your house for brunch — you're making Corned Beef Hash! Now, we know the thought of corned beef hash conjures up greasy, mushy, salty memories from a poorly lit diner, but the following recipe will change your mind for good.  CORNED BEEF BREAKFAST HASHCookbook author Cassy Joy Garcia has created a healthy Paleo version of this dish for her blog Fed + Fit. Photo Credit Fed+Fit Ingredients: 4 pounds red skinned potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon paprika 1 tablespoon butter 2 bunches collard greens, de-stemmed and finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (about 1/2 a lemon) Leftover Corned Beef, chopped 1-2 eggs per serving, soft boiled, poached, or fried pickled onions, for garnish fresh chopped chives, for garnish Photo Credit Fed+Fit Directions: For the potatoes, toss the cubed potatoes in the olive oil. Spread them out evenly on two baking sheets. Sprinkle the tops evenly with the salt, garlic, and paprika. Bake at 375 F for 40 to 45 minutes, or until they start to brown and crisp, but not burn. Melt the butter in a large pan. Add the chopped collards, toss to combine, and cover to steam. Once the collards are wilted, add the lemon juice, and corned beef. Stir to combine and cook just long enough to reheat the corned beef. Remove from heat and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, toss the potatoes with the collards and corned beef. Plate and top with the eggs (cooked however you like), pickled onions, and chives. So go ahead, poach a couple of eggs (or duck eggs!), toss in some greens, and use up every last bit of that corned beef!

Read More

Burgers: Create Your Own Custom Grinds for Super Bowl

January 30, 2016

Burgers: Create Your Own Custom Grinds for Super Bowl
Super Bowl Sunday is a week away and while it's mostly about football, we know it's really about food. If you are planning a menu for the big day but have dismissed the idea of burgers as too boring, think again! Everyone loves a good burger when done right, i.e. juicy, beefy and flavorful. We'll let you in on a little secret — the key is in the blend of meats you use. There are wonderful variations worth exploring when it comes to selecting which cuts of beef to use for your patties. By adding different cuts you can change the flavor profile of your burger in a myriad of ways. The key to an extremely juicy burger is to create a grind with an overall protein-to-fat ratio of 70/30 for medium-rare to medium-well and 80/20 for rare. As long as you maintain this ratio, you can experiment to your heart's content. Some of our favorite grinds include short rib, hangar steak, and sirloin. For a smokey flavor, try adding bacon. Ask us, we are happy to suggest some creative and flavorful combinations.  One of the most famous burgers on the scene these days is from the Charleston, South Carolina restaurant Husk. There, Chef Sean Brock has blended chuck, flank steak and bacon for a mouth-watering — yet not overly fussy — cheeseburger. The recipe is below and a complete showstopper! Husk's Famous Cheeseburger Ingredients (makes enough for 10 cheeseburgers)  For the special sauce 1 3/4 cups mayonnaise 1 1/4 cups yellow mustard 5 tablespoons ketchup 1/2 cup Bread and Butter pickles, drained and cut into 1/8-inch dice 1/4 cup pickled jalapeños, drained and cut into 1/8-inch dice  grated zest (use a Microplane) and juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon hot sauce  Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 tablespoons pepper vinegar  For the cheeseburgers Custom grind of 1 (3-pound) fresh boneless chuck roast, 12 ounces fresh flank steak and 3 ounces bacon 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature 10 burger buns, preferably potato rolls 1 cup white onion, shaved 20 slices American cheese 50 Bread and Butter pickles   Directions For the sauce: Combine all of the ingredients in a large container and stir together to blend well. Cover and refrigerate. (Tightly covered, the sauce will keep for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.) For the cheeseburgers: Portion the meat mixture into twenty 3-ounce patties, about 1/2-inch thick (each burger gets 2 patties). If not cooking right away, arrange on a baking sheet, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate. (The patties can be refrigerated for up to 1 day. Remove from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before you’re ready to cook; it’s important that the patties are not ice-cold when they hit the hot pan.) Generously butter the tops and bottoms of the buns. Toast on a griddle until nice and golden brown. Reserve. Heat grill or two 12-inch cast-iron skillets until as hot as possible. Divide the patties between the two hot pans. When the patties are nice and charred, about 2 minutes, flip them over and cook to desired doneness. Place the onion slices on 10 of the patties. Place a slice of the cheese on all of the patties and allow it to melt, about 30 seconds. Stack the non-onion patties on top of the onion patties. Remove from the heat. Smear both sides of the buns with special sauce. Place 5 pickles on the bottom half of each bun. Add the burger patties and top with the top halves of the buns. Serve at once.  

Read More

September 02, 2015

Lacking Ideas for Labor Day? Let Us Help!
Labor Day is fast approaching and if you're anything like us, your weekend is packed with get-togethers, parties and plenty of opportunities to flex your culinary muscle. If inspiration hasn't struck yet, here is a list of ideas to get you motivated. Whether you're into smoking, grilling or slow-cooking, we've got you covered. It's a busy week, be sure to call ahead to place your order. Labor Day Items Berkshire Pork Baby Back or St. Louis-Style Ribs Berkshire Pork Shoulder Brisket - whole packer cut for smoker Whole Fish - wild-caught Red Snapper, Bronzino Bone in Chicken Breast and Thighs Waygu Hot Dogs Bison Hot Dogs Sausages - Wild Boar, Green, Bratwurst, Lamb Merguez   Too many great steaks to list here! A wide variety of spice rubs and sauces   And don't forget about our great selection of wine and beer. Happy cooking!

Read More

March 27, 2015

Leg of Lamb with Garlic and Rosemary + Ordering for Easter/Passover at The Organic Butcher
We are gearing up for the Spring Holidays at The Organic Butcher. There is still plenty of time to place your orders for lamb, ham, pork, rabbit or briskets. Order online on our new website or call us at 703-790-8300.   Popular seasonal items and recommendations are as follows: LOCAL LAMBBone-In Leg of Lamb (7-9 lbs)  - $12.99/LBBoneless Leg of Lamb (5-7 lbs) - $13.99/LBFrench Lamb Rack ( 1.5-2 lbs) - $24.99/LBLamb Shoulder Roast - $10.99/LBLamb Shank (1.5 lb avg.) - $7.99/LBBoneless Lamb Loin (@1 lb. ea.) - $29.99/LB FRESH HAMS, SMOKED HAMS AND PORKSkin-on Fresh Ham / Pork Leg  (6-24 lb.) - $6.99/lb.Nitrate-Free Semi-boneless Spiral Ham (6-8 lb.) - $9.99/lb.Nitrate-Free Boneless Berkshire Hams (6-8 lb. and 14-17 lb.) $9.99/lb.Berkshire Frenched Pork Rack - $14.99/lb.Skin-on Berkshire Pork Belly - $6.99/lb. RABBIT - $11.99/LB First Cut BRISKETS for Passover - $8.99/lb.Seder bones also available ADDITIONAL ITEMS: We will have plenty of roasts, seafood, wild game, and fresh produce for side dishes.  One of our very favorite ways to prepare leg of lamb is with copious amounts of garlic and rosemary. The following recipe is sure to be a hit on your holiday table. Leg of Lamb with Garlic and Rosemary (epicurious)Makes 8 servings Ingredients (all available at The Organic Butcher of McLean)1 (7-9 pound) leg of lamb, fat trimmed to 1/4 inch thick, and lamb tied4 garlic cloves1 tablespoon fine sea salt2 tablespoons chopped local, organic fresh rosemary1/2 teaspoon black pepper1/4 cup dry red wine or beef brothWhole grain Dijon mustard (optional) PreparationPat lamb dry and score fat by making shallow cuts all over with tip of a sharp small knife. Pound garlic to a paste with sea salt using a mortar and pestle (or mince and mash with a heavy knife) and stir together with rosemary and pepper. Put lamb in a lightly oiled roasting pan, then rub paste all over lamb. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350°F. (Optional: Add whole grain Dijon to the crust, and cook at 400 for 20 minutes, then reduce to 350.) Roast lamb in middle of oven until an instant-read thermometer inserted 2 inches into thickest part of meat (do not touch bone) registers 130°F, 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 hours. Transfer to a cutting board and let stand 15 to 25 minutes (internal temperature will rise to about 140°F for medium-rare). Add wine to pan and deglaze by boiling over moderately high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits, 1 minute. Season pan juices with salt and pepper and serve with lamb.  

Read More

How to Make Your Own Corned Beef for St. Patrick's Day

March 03, 2015

How to Make Your Own Corned Beef for St. Patrick's Day
St. Patrick's Day is right around the corner but there is still time to try your hand at making authentic corned beef for the holiday.  Corned beef is a preparation in which a cut of beef, traditionally the brisket, is cured in a brine solution along with various seasonings, and then slowly simmered until it's tender and flavorful. Although the exact beginnings of corned beef are unknown, it most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Corned beef remains popular in the United Kingdom and countries with British culinary traditions. Contrary to popular belief, corned beef is not considered an Irish national dish, but originates as part of St. Patrick's Day celebrations in Irish-American culture. The following is a recipe from Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking and Curing for both the spice mix and home curing. PICKLING SPICE2 tbsp black peppercorns2 tbsp mustard seeds2 tbsp coriander seeds2 tbsp hot red pepper flakes2 tbsp allspice berries1 tbsp ground mace2 small cinnamon sticks, crushed or broken into pieces2 to 4 bay leaves, crumbled2 tbsp whole cloves1 tbsp ground ginger Combine peppercorns, mustard seeds and coriander seeds in a small dry pan. Place over medium heat and stir until fragrant, being careful not to burn them; keep lid handy in case seeds pop. Crack peppercorns and seeds in mortar and pestle or with the side of a knife on cutting board. Combine with other spices, mix. Store in tightly sealed plastic or glass container. For our pre-made corned beef, we typically brine cure our brisket for 7-10 days flipping the meat every day or so.  HOME-CURED CORNED BEEF1-1/2 cups kosher salt½ cup sugar4 teaspoons pink salt or Instacure #1 (sodium nitrite), optional3 cloves garlic, minced4 tablespoons pickling spice1 4-5-pound first cut brisket1 carrot, peeled and roughly chopped1 medium onion, peeled and cut in two1 celery stalk, roughly chopped. In pot large enough to hold brisket, combine 1 gallon of water with kosher salt, sugar, sodium nitrite (if using), garlic and 2 tablespoons pickling spice. Bring to a simmer, stirring until salt and sugar are dissolved. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate until chilled. Place brisket in brine, weighted with a plate to keep it submerged; cover. Refrigerate for 5 days.  Remove brisket from brine and rinse thoroughly with cold water. Add the cured brisket to a baking pan with beef broth and beer if you choose to add beer. We prefer a stout for this step!Throw a couple carrots or celery in there and braise at 350 degrees for 3 hours or until fork tender. Check halfway through to make sure you have enough liquid and add more if needed. Remove and let rest in the broth check seasoning for salt and pepper.Slice and enjoy! Keep warm until ready to serve. Meat can be refrigerated for several days in cooking liquid. Reheat in the liquid or serve chilled. Slice thinly and serve on a sandwich or with additional vegetables simmered until tender in the cooking liquid.  Sláinte mhaith!

Read More

How To Smoke a Brisket Recipe on the Big Green Egg

June 17, 2014

How To Smoke a Brisket Recipe on the Big Green Egg
The best way to cook our local Angus or Wagyu Brisket is to smoke it on the Big Green Egg. We've been floored by how tender and delicious our Wagyu Briskets have been turning out lately and while we love our Angus briskets, the Wagyu has taken top honors in the flavor and tenderness departments. Step 1 - Go to The Organic Butcher and pick up 10-12 LB of whole brisket (also referred to as a Packer-Cut brisket).   Step 2 - Rub with extra virgin olive oil and a BBQ style rub. We have great seasonings in the shop! Ask one of our knowledgable staff members to help you pair your meat with a rub that suits your menu plan.    Step 3 - Use Big Green Egg Organic Lump Charcoal. If you use woodchips, make sure to pick a milder option like Cherry or Pecan Wood Chips. Heat your Big Green Egg to between 225-275 degrees. With the fat side facing up, smoke for 10-12 hours or until the temperature at the center of the brisket reaches 190-200 degrees.     Step 4 - Wrap your finished brisket in tin foil and let it sit for 30-45 minutes. You can even place the wrapped brisket in a cooler for a few hours to hold in the heat which lets the brisket continue to cook and tenderize further. When you're ready to eat, un-wrap and slice into the most tender and delicious brisket you've ever had! Enjoy!

Read More

Get special discounts and
exclusive updates

Follow The Organic Butcher
On instagram
Special Orders